Weekly Football Phrase: To slam

slam Every week during the 2010-11 season, the languagecaster team explain a football phrase or cliché for learners of English who love the sport. Click on the link below to hear the word or phrase and you can also read the transcript below that. You can find many more examples by going to our football phrase page here football clichés here and our huge football glossary here.

to slam.mp3

Transcript

This week on languagecaster’s look at footballing language we focus in a footballing cliché often used in newspaper headlines. The cliché is – to slam. To slam means to criticise heavily, to attack verbally. This week there have been two examples in which to slam has been used in football news headlines. The first example is connected with the disagreement between the Argentinian and Man City forward Carlos Tevez and his club – Tevez agent slams City’s Cook. So this means that Tevez’s agent has attacked or disagreed with Manchester City’s owners and administrators. It can also be used in the passive form as in this example: Blatter slammed by gay groups. This refers to FIFA’s President, Sepp Blatter’s comments that homosexuals should refrain from ‘sexual activities’ during the World Cup in Qatar in 2022 – homosexuality is illegal in the country. In this headline gay rights groups criticise the comments of the head of FIFA.

To slam or be slammed by

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I was born and brought up near Chester in the north west of England. I have always loved playing and talking about sport, especially football!
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