goal droughtIn this week’s football phrase we explain the expression goal drought. Find out more about this phrase by reading the transcript below and listening to the audio. You can also find many more examples of soccer vocabulary by going to our football cliches page here and our huge football glossary here.

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Goal Drought

The word drought is used to describe a situation when a shortage of rain means that crops may not be able to grow. In football a goal drought is when a player has not managed to score a goal in a very long time. So, if a striker has not scored for a while we can say that he or she is suffering a goal drought. When the striker scores we can then say that they have broken or ended their goal drought. Goal drought.

  • Example: Tottenham striker Roberto Soldado ended his ten-match goal drought with a volleyed goal against Fiorentina in the Europa League
  • Example: Sunderland striker Danny Graham has not scored in his first 20 appearances for the club – a real goal drought.

Related Vocabulary

Check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and if you have any suggestions or questions, contact us at admin@languagecaster.com

Learn English Through Football
Learn English Through Football
Learn English Through Football

Welcome to the website that helps students interested in football improve their English language skills. Soccer fans can enhance these skills with lots of free language resources: a weekly podcast, football phrases, explanations of football vocabulary, football cliches, worksheets, quizzes and much more at languagecaster.com.

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