This week’s weekly football phrase is all about winning a cup or a championship. Find out more about this phrase by reading the transcript below and listening to the audio, while you can also find many more examples of soccer vocabulary by going to our football cliches page here and our huge football glossary here. If you have questions or comments, please email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.

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(to be) Crowned Champions

It is the business end of the season when teams are battling to win cups and titles – they are hoping to be crowned champions. To wear a crown is to be a king or queen, or in sport, a champion. While crown is a noun, it can also be used as a verb – to crown, and in this phrase it is used passively, to be crowned. To be crowned champions, therefore, means to win the title in the league or a competition. (to be) Crowned Champions

  • Example: PSV were crowned as the 2015 Eredivisie champions after defeating Heerenveen 4-1 to win their 22nd Dutch title.
  • Example: Germany were crowned champions of the world for the fourth time in Brazil 2014.

Check out our glossary of footballing phrases here. If you have any suggestions, contact us at admin@languagecaster.com

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Learn English Through FootballWelcome to the website that helps students interested in football improve their English language skills. Football fans can practise with lots of free language resources, including football-language podcasts and our huge football-language glossary.

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CEpisode 413