Heavy Metal Football – Football Language Podcast: 2021-22 Season

This football language podcast looks at the phrase – heavy metal football. This is a quote from the German coach, Jurgen Klopp, and is often used to describe a style of play. The transcript for this podcast is available below, and we also have a massive glossary of footballing phrases here. You can visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts, and if you have any suggestions or questions please contact us at admin@languagecaster.com or leave a question or comment on our forum. (DB=Damon)

Heavy Metal Football – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

bounceDB: Hi there everyone. Happy New Year. We hope you are all well and enjoying the football wherever you are. Let’s hope 2022 is a good one, and particularly that we can say goodbye to the COVID-19 pandemic.

My name’s Damon, one half of the langaugecaster team, and I’m in a chilly January Tokyo. Damian, the other member of the languagecaster team is in London, which I’m guessing is also pretty cold at this time of year. He has been busy over the winter holiday season, posting on football language – stripped of the captaincy and rollercoaster. Check out the podcast on the Women’s FA Cup final between Arsenal and Chelseas too

On this podcast, I’ll be talking about the phrase ‘heavy metal football‘ and other language related to it.

Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in German).

DB: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com, and that message was in German. At the beginning of the year, on the 2nd of January Chelsea played Liverpool in an action-packed game that ended 2-2. It could be described as heavy metal football, a phrase used by Jurgen Klopp in 2013. This phrase is often used to describe fast, exciting football, but what does it mean?

First of all, Klopp used the phrase to describe the style of football he prefers as a coach. He said in an interview in the Daily Mail –

“[Arsene Wenger] likes having the ball, playing football, passes. It’s like an orchestra. But it’s a silent song. But I like heavy metal more. I always want it loud,”

When you use this phrase, you are describing a style of play that involves a lot of pressing, playing a high line, trying to win the ball back as soon as you lose it; basically, as Goal.com says, ‘intense, fast, and energetic’. This definitely describes the Chelsea 2-2 Liverpool game, especially the first half, which saw the four goals scored and both teams pressing and counter pressing.

** Click below to donate to languagecaster.com and keep the football language coming! **

A 100 miles per hour

DB: So what other phrases are related to this, well, you can say the game was played at 100 miles per hour. This is Skysports using the phrase to describe Liverpool: ‘Liverpool’s utterly unapologetic style – a high line, 100mph, full-backs committing – makes them incredibly potent in the final third.’ 

100mph emphasises the speed of play: first time passes as well as quick pressing.

Gegenpress

And talking of pressing, or quickly putting pressure on the opponent when they receive the ball, the German word gegenpress is now often used in English when talking about football. It means to counter press, which is to immediately try to get the ball back after losing possession, but also trying to pressure the opponents into making a mistake in their half. This means if you can get possession of the ball back in this area, you can launch a counter attack.

End-to-end

If you want to emphasise that the game was exciting because both teams have chances, use the phrase end-to-end. Here’s the headline from the Mirror online describing the Chelsea vs Liverpool match: ‘Chelsea 2-2 Liverpool: 5 talking points as end-to-end thriller finishes all square.’

And here is another quote from the pride of London website: ‘Till the very last minute, it was a breathless end-to-end highly entertaining game.’

Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Cantonese).

Good Bye

DB: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com and thank you for that message in Cantonese! OK, so it’s time to wrap up this short football language podcast about heavy metal football. We looked at the phrase ‘heavy metal football’ used to describe an exciting, 100 miles per hour style of play, that often produces end-to-end action with gegenpress creating lots of chances. Heavy metal football, play at 100 mph, gegenpress, and end-to-end action, all phrases used to describe great matches.

Drop us a line anytime at admin@languagecaster.com. You can read the transcript for the show on our website at languagecaster.com and post on our forum! And if you like what we do leave a donation to keep our site up and running. Enjoy all the football, Happy New Year again! Ta-ra!

Subscribe to
Learn English Through Football

Or subscribe with your favorite app by using the address below

Hosted by
grell

I was born and brought up near Chester in the north west of England. I have always loved playing and talking about sport, especially football!
Google | Facebook | Twitter | Mail | Website

Join the discussion

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Languagecaster

Learn English Through FootballWelcome to the website that helps students interested in football improve their English language skills. Football fans can practise with lots of free language resources, including football-language podcasts and our huge football-language glossary.

Recent Forum Posts

  • Make way

    What does "make way" mean in the following sentences? ...

    By Dwi , 16 mins ago

  • Back in the contest

    I hear the commentator say "in the contest" when they s...

    By Dwi , 1 day ago

  • high

    What does "high" actually mean in football? Spurs 2-1...

    By Dwi , 1 day ago

HEpisode 784