grell

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  • in reply to: To tease #60851
    grell
    Keymaster

    Hi Hyuna,

    If you tease someone, you pretend you will give them something but don’t. They will be frustrated.

    ‘Barnes teases Alexander-Arnold down the left.’ means Barnes took the ball close to Alexander-Arnold, so he thought he can get (have) the ball, but Barnes kept the ball just out of Arnold’s reach – he couldn’t get the ball.

    A teasing ball (teasing – adjective) – is a pass that is an attractive pass but maybe o player can reach it – neither the defence nor the attack – it is out of reach, close to a good chance.

    Your middle example is a little more difficult. It is a different meaning of ‘tease’- which is to untangle (for example comb or brush hair to make it smooth). To tease a ball into the box is to find a way to pass the ball through the defence.

    Damon

    in reply to: To probe/to be camped deep #60850
    grell
    Keymaster

    Hi Hyuna,

    To probe is to examine or test (eg. a space probe is a scientific machine sent to explore space). So if a team ‘probes’ it means they test the oppositions defence.

    It has a nuance of calmly test – so, ‘City probe across the edge of the Fulham area, but the home defence holds firm.’ means Manchester City were passing the ball in a controlled way in front of Fulham’s penalty area, looking for an opening, testing the defence.

    To be camped in uses the verb to camp, to put up a tent pr to stop and rest somewhere. If a team is camped in another team’s half, it means they have so much possession they are almost ‘living’ in the half – they have put their tent up and are ‘staying’ in the half.

    Hope that helps,

    Damon

    in reply to: Do the business, flying, work #60481
    grell
    Keymaster

    Hi there Hyuna27g,

    It’s been a while since we heard from you.

    ‘Aubameyang does the business’ – to do the business, means to complete a task successfully.’The business’ as in ‘It’s the business’ is also a common expression (not in football) to mean something is cool, so Aubameyang does the business means he scores well.

    ‘Flying’means doing very well recently; on a good run of form.

    Hope that helps!

    Damon and Damian

    in reply to: Ripper, crash it in, thunder it in #57339
    grell
    Keymaster

    Hi Hyuna27,

    Well, they all mean pretty much the same thing – a very powerful shot. One difference is that thunder and crash are both verbs, while a ripper, refers to the shot or goal and is a noun. Therefore, you could have ‘The player thundered in a ripper!’ – but this would be a little unusual!

    Other verbs used to describe powerful shots are –
    To smash the ball in/home
    To hammer home

    Hope that helps,

    Damon

    in reply to: go astray, flatten #38419
    grell
    Keymaster

    Hi Hyuna27g_

    71′ Quick passing from the champions around th St Johnstone defence but the final pass goes astray.

    42′ Late challenge on Nesbitt from Reilly. Celtic take the free kick quickly only for Breslin’s cross to go astray.

    If something goes astray, it is lost, or can’t be found. So if a pass goes astray, it doesn’t reach its target.

    90′ + 5′ Mikel flattens Payet and is booked. There may not even be time to restart this game. [West Ham 2-1 Chelsea]

    To flatten means to knock over (with a lot of force), so in this case Mikel fouls Payet by barging him over.

    in reply to: pick out, mercy, scuff #38055
    grell
    Keymaster

    Some great questions again!

    You are right to think that the phrases to break and on the counter basically mean the same thing. They are often used combined like this to add emphasis.

    For pick out – see our latest post (thanks for the idea!).

    At his mercy means the player can choose what to do, there is no-one to stop him/her. So the goal is at his mercy means the goal is unguarded, it is open, the player has a free shot.

    To scuff – see our football glossary entry here.

    in reply to: hammer in smark free kick #37830
    grell
    Keymaster

    This phrase describes two actions. The first is a smart free kick by Yann M’vila – so a clever skillful free kick. The second is a powerful shot by Fletcher, who ‘hammered’ the free kick home.

    Sometimes a free kick is a direct shot at goal, but in this case, the free kick was a pass.

    Hope that helps!

    grell
    Keymaster

    Let’s take a look at these words in their context:

    74′ Splendid run from Lanzini who sprints 40-yards up the pitch on a counter. He produces a fine touch to nudge the ball past Coates, who then lunges in and takes him to ground. He doesn’t like the call, but it’s an easy decision for the referee who produces a yellow card as well.

    Run: This simply means a run; if you make a run, you run with the ball up the pitch
    Up the pitch on a counter: To run into the opposition half on a counter attack (a quick attack that happens after the opposition attack is stopped)
    Nudge: to hit/push slightly; here it means to touch the ball softly – not hit it hard – and score
    Lunge in: dive in; tackle aggressively
    Take him to ground: knocks the player to the ground
    Like the call: agree with the decision

    Hope that helps!

    in reply to: head the hosts level / fire Man Utd ahead #37547
    grell
    Keymaster

    Hi Hyuna,
    Greta questions again. You are right when you say ‘To head’ means to hit the ball with your head, to do a header. So to head the hosts level, means to score a goal with a header, and to make the scores equal – int he match above Aguero7s header made the score 1-1, after Manchester City were 0-1 down.

    To fire, means to score, so to fire ahead, means to score and take the lead. Fire also is often combined with home, to give fire home.

    in reply to: go on the counter / thwart #37545
    grell
    Keymaster

    Go on the counter means to attack quickly after stopping an attack by the opponents – to counter attack.
    To thwart is to stop, so in football, to stop an attack, for example, with a tackle.
    You are right – “What a counter” means “What a (great) counter attack”.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 29 total)

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