Football Language: To sit out

sit outLet’s talk about the verb phrase to sit out, which means to miss or to not take part in. If a player sits out a game, they do not start, indeed probably they are not even on the bench. So, when a player is injured we can say they will sit out the next game, or have sat out the last three games for example. This weekend, it is likely that Daniel Sturridge will sit out Liverpool’s game with Bournemouth. Another way to talk about missing a game is to the say the player has been sidelined.
  • Example: The player sat out the game with a bad injury.

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Learn English Through FootballWelcome to the website that helps students interested in football improve their English language skills. Football fans can practise with lots of free language resources, including football-language podcasts and our huge football-language glossary.

Football GlossaryEpisode 664