Football Language: Down to ten men

This post explains the football phrase ‘Down to ten men’ which is often used when a player has been injured or sent off.

This post explains Down to ten menthe football phrase ‘Down to ten men’ which is often used when a player has been injured or sent off.

  • Find out more about this phrase by reading the transcript below.
  • You can also find many more examples of soccer vocabulary by going to our football cliches page here and our huge football glossary here.

Down to ten men

There are 11 players on a football team and if one of these players is sent off or injured then you might hear the phrase ‘down to ten men‘ being used. This might be for a short period of time if a player is injured and the team is waiting for the substitute to come on to the pitch or it might be longer and more permanent as a player has been sent off. In the recent Confederations Cup group match between Germany and Cameroon the African champions went down to ten men in the second half and eventually lost the game 3-1. Down to ten men.

Example: Crystal Palace boss Allardyce felt Manchester City should have been down to ten men in the second half (Croydon Examiner: Jan 28th 2017)

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Learn English Through FootballWelcome to the website that helps students interested in football improve their English language skills. Football fans can practise with lots of free language resources, including football-language podcasts and our huge football-language glossary.

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