on the roadWhat is the meaning of the phrase ‘on the road’ in football and when do we use it?

  • Find out more about this phrase by reading the transcript below.
  • You can also find many more examples of soccer vocabulary by going to our football cliches page here and our huge football glossary here.

On the road

In a football game one side plays at home – the home team – and the other is the away side. A common term heard to describe the away team is the phrase ‘on the road‘ as the away team needs to travel to get to the game. So, for example, if a team has won on the road it means that they have won away from home. On the road.

  • Example: The team failed to win on the road for the whole season – they lost all 19 games!

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2 comments
  • An idiom often heared when a player is sent-off is that he “got his marching orders”. Maybe you can add this expression to the online-vocabulary because in German the meaning is quite often used in a contrary way: If someone “gets his marching orders” he is assigned a special task usually requiring skills and bravery. It´s more often used to stress special skills of someone qualififying him or her for a special taks.

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