2019 Women’s World Cup: Day 7 – Australia vs South Africa

2019 Women’s World Cup: Day 7 – Australia vs South Africa: Day 7 saw us treated to a thriller in Montpellier. The Brazilians seemed to be cruising with a two goal lead at half time, but were stunned 3-2 by an Australian come from behind victory.

2019 Women's World Cup: Day 62019 Women’s World Cup: Day 7 – Australia vs South Africa: Day 7 saw us treated to a thriller in Montpellier. The Brazilians seemed to be cruising with a two goal lead at half time, but were stunned 3-2 by an Australian come from behind victory. The Brazilian veteran Marta made World Cup history by scoring in five World Cups, as she opened the scoring from the spot. However, the Australians stormed back into the game with goals from Foord Logarzo and an own goal by Brazil centre back Alves. In the other match yesterday, China took on South Africa, in a must-win match for both teams. China bossed the game and relied on their power in the air to threaten the South African goal. It was a cross whipped in from the right and knocked into the net by Li Ying that gave China the vital win in Group B, 1-0.

We’ll take a look at the phrases spot and boss the game later in this post. In the languagecaster predictions competition, Nina is still on top but has been joined by the home team Learn English Through Football on 21 points. If you have questions or comments you can email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.

2019 Women’s World Cup Language: Spot

A spot is a small round circle and in football it refers to the penalty spot. You will often hear ‘score from the spot‘ in commentary or read it in reports. It means to convert a penalty, to score a penalty. Here’s an example from the Straits Times reporting on the Australia versus Brazil game in group C: “Marta opened the scoring after 27 minutes, converting from the spot after Leticia Santos was fouled by Elise Kellond-Knight.”

You may also hear spot used as an adjective – a spot kick. The referee awarded a spot kick, for example.

Related Phrases

2019 Women’s World Cup Language: (to) Boss the Game

China beat South Africa by just one goal, which was pushed past the onrushing goalkeeper by Li Ying. But, although they only scored once, China bossed the game, that is, they dominated the game. The Asian side had 16 shots to South Africa’s 5 and always looked threatening when balls were floated into the box from corners or crosses. Here’s an example of ‘to boss’ in a Sportinglife report on the England vs Scotland match: “The Lionesses bossed things in the first half of their Women’s World Cup opener in Nice, during which Nikita Parris scored a 14th-minute penalty and Ellen White added a curled finish shortly before the break.”

2019 Women’s World Cup Predictions

In the languagecaster predictions competition, Nina is still on top but has been joined by the home team Learn English Through Football on 21 points. They are followed by Yukiko on 20 and then HP Sauce, Jon, jlacey, and Paul on 18. Both Yukiko and Learn English Through Football bagged three points for correctly predicting a 1-0 win for China over South Africa

There are three games on day 7 with England versus Argentina looking tasty – remember 1998? There’s Japan taking on Scotland in the other D game, and the last game is Italy against Jamaica. Italy can take control of Group C with a win here.

To play the predictions game, it’s not too late, you can log in/register and then add your scores. More information about playing can be found here. There will be a small prize for the winner!

Next Matches

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Current Ranking – Day 5                  

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Check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and you can ask questions about football language here in our forums. If you have any suggestions, contact us at admin@languagecaster.com

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I was born and brought up near Chester in the north west of England. I have always loved playing and talking about sport, especially football!
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